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Sweet Watermelon Bunting

Mar 27, 2016

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A few weeks ago one of my slightly craft-challenged besties sent out an SOS ~ an urgent request for some watermelon bunting for her daughter's birthday party. Now you can't leave a sister hanging, so I set about hooking up some quick little slices of watermelon, mostly while I 'watched' the boys play on the beach! 

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I posted my progress pics over on Instagram & Facebook and there was such a wonderful reaction to them that I decided to publish a little free pattern here for you all...

 

Sweet Watermelon Bunting

 

Materials:

Small amount of yarn ~ I used Rico Essentials Cotton DK in Candy Pink, Pistachio, Emerald, & Black.

E - 3.5mm hook

Scissors

Yarn Needle

Twine (approx 2m)

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Abbreviations (US Terms):

st - stitch

ch - chain

sc - single crochet

dc - double crochet

Notes:

  • Any weight of yarn can be used to make the bunting, you'll just need to adjust the size of your hook to suit. 
  • The watermelon slices are worked in rows.
  • Colours are changed by switching to the next colour in the last yarn over of the last stitch of the row prior to the new colour. Alternatively, you can fasten off with one colour and join with a slip stitch in the new colour at the beginning of the new row. 

Row 1 (Pink): Begin with a magic ring, chain 3 (counts as a dc now and throughout), 2 dc into the magic ring, pull the tail of the magic ring tight to close.

Row 2 - 7: Ch 3 & turn, dc in the same st, dc in each st until one st remains, 2 dc in the last st (top of the ch 3).

Row 8 (Pistachio): Ch 1 & turn, sc in the same st and in each st to the end of the row.

Row 9 (Emerald): Ch 3 & turn, dc in the same st, dc in each st until one st remains, 2 dc in the last st (top of the ch 3). Fasten off and weave in ends.

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Making the Pips:

Take a length of black yarn and thread your yarn needle. Decide on a right/wrong side of your watermelon slices and insert your needle from the back (wrong side) to the front (right side) into a spot where you would like your first pip. Sew twice around to create a bold pip. Tie the ends carefully on the wrong side and trim the ends short (with cotton yarn you can leave the ends short, but if you are using acrylic or wool you will need to leave the ends longer and weave them in). Repeat the process for 2 or 3 more pips. 

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Repeat this whole process until you have the number of watermelon slices you need for your bunting (I used 9).

Adding the slices to the twine: Thread the needle with the twine and insert it into the edges of the 'emerald rind' of each of the watermelon slices. Drag the slices along until they sit flat and are evenly spaced. Tie loops at the ends of your twine for easy hanging.

Note: If you're super observant you might have noticed that the bunting in the picture below is a little different to the slice in the tutorial... oops! If you prefer the thicker light green portion with a thinner dark green rind then you can adapt the pattern as follows:

Row 8 (Pistachio): Ch 3 & turn, dc in the same st, dc in each st until one st remains, 2 dc in the last st (top of the ch 3).

Row 9 (Emerald): Ch 1 & turn, sc in the same st and in each st to the end of the row.

Row 10: Ch 1 & turn, 2 sc in the first st, sc in each st until one st remains, 2 sc in the last st. Fasten off and weave in ends. 

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I really hope you enjoy making your own watermelon bunting! I'd love to see your creations ~ please tag #thelittlebee in your IG photos, or post them to The little bee FB page :)

Before I sign off I thought I'd share a snap of my pattern writing buddy, Bindy. As you can see she is super helpful in setting up the shots! And not so keen to move...

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Happy hooking!

 

Alia  (& Bindy) x

 



Category: Patterns

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